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yagazieemezi:

Frankly Speaking With: Adesuwa Pariyapasat
She’s stunning and ambitious; armed with an arresting personality and fascinatingly quick-witted, meet Adesuwa Pariyapasat, a model currently based in New York City. With a rising career, Adesuwa offers a look that is versatile and yet, insanely unique. But beyond her smashing exterior, she has a lot more to share with us. Via video chat, we settled down on opposite sides of the country and spent two hours candidly discussing her modeling career, pride as a Nigerian, ties to home, and achieving the maximum in life.
(excerpt from interview)
Y: Many African families have a set social structure when it comes to raising children; to set them on this institutionalized educational path to what they hope will be a steady career and financial success. Not all take that path. What do you have to say in the form of advice to our youth who want to follow their creative and sometimes unconventional (at least to their parents) dreams?
Adesuwa: Initially, being a model was not the path for me. I was literally bred to become a doctor since I was a kid. It’s hard coming from Nigeria where everyone’s goal is to get an education and become something, but they don’t realize that if you are a natural born artist, it sort of kills you on the inside when you can’t become who you are. I didn’t like medical school. I used to cry in the labotory. I was 16 and interning for NASA, but I was so unhappy. I tried to please my parents, but it was really hard. It took a leap of faith to convince myself that I could make it in modeling. If you honestly believe in your craft, if that’s all that you think and dream about, you should do it. Life is really, really short. Any one of us could die at any given time, any single say. Any of us. Right the fuck now, you could just die. Do what you want to make yourself happy.
It doesn’t matter if your parents are upset with you, eventually they will come back around because they’re still your parents. I feel like every child brings dishonor at some point, ‘Oh no you bring dishonor!’ I got scouted but went back to school because I felt that I had to give my parents some kind of honor. But I was really, really, really unhappy. I don’t know, it just felt right that I became a model. It just felt right that I wasn’t a medical doctor. Again with my brother’s death, everything was put into perspective so honestly, if you truly believe in something, you should do it. 
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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Nigerian pride
Zoom Info
yagazieemezi:

Frankly Speaking With: Adesuwa Pariyapasat
She’s stunning and ambitious; armed with an arresting personality and fascinatingly quick-witted, meet Adesuwa Pariyapasat, a model currently based in New York City. With a rising career, Adesuwa offers a look that is versatile and yet, insanely unique. But beyond her smashing exterior, she has a lot more to share with us. Via video chat, we settled down on opposite sides of the country and spent two hours candidly discussing her modeling career, pride as a Nigerian, ties to home, and achieving the maximum in life.
(excerpt from interview)
Y: Many African families have a set social structure when it comes to raising children; to set them on this institutionalized educational path to what they hope will be a steady career and financial success. Not all take that path. What do you have to say in the form of advice to our youth who want to follow their creative and sometimes unconventional (at least to their parents) dreams?
Adesuwa: Initially, being a model was not the path for me. I was literally bred to become a doctor since I was a kid. It’s hard coming from Nigeria where everyone’s goal is to get an education and become something, but they don’t realize that if you are a natural born artist, it sort of kills you on the inside when you can’t become who you are. I didn’t like medical school. I used to cry in the labotory. I was 16 and interning for NASA, but I was so unhappy. I tried to please my parents, but it was really hard. It took a leap of faith to convince myself that I could make it in modeling. If you honestly believe in your craft, if that’s all that you think and dream about, you should do it. Life is really, really short. Any one of us could die at any given time, any single say. Any of us. Right the fuck now, you could just die. Do what you want to make yourself happy.
It doesn’t matter if your parents are upset with you, eventually they will come back around because they’re still your parents. I feel like every child brings dishonor at some point, ‘Oh no you bring dishonor!’ I got scouted but went back to school because I felt that I had to give my parents some kind of honor. But I was really, really, really unhappy. I don’t know, it just felt right that I became a model. It just felt right that I wasn’t a medical doctor. Again with my brother’s death, everything was put into perspective so honestly, if you truly believe in something, you should do it. 
Read full interview
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Nigerian pride
Zoom Info

yagazieemezi:

Frankly Speaking With: Adesuwa Pariyapasat

She’s stunning and ambitious; armed with an arresting personality and fascinatingly quick-witted, meet Adesuwa Pariyapasat, a model currently based in New York City. With a rising career, Adesuwa offers a look that is versatile and yet, insanely unique. But beyond her smashing exterior, she has a lot more to share with us. Via video chat, we settled down on opposite sides of the country and spent two hours candidly discussing her modeling career, pride as a Nigerian, ties to home, and achieving the maximum in life.

(excerpt from interview)

Y: Many African families have a set social structure when it comes to raising children; to set them on this institutionalized educational path to what they hope will be a steady career and financial success. Not all take that path. What do you have to say in the form of advice to our youth who want to follow their creative and sometimes unconventional (at least to their parents) dreams?

Adesuwa: Initially, being a model was not the path for me. I was literally bred to become a doctor since I was a kid. It’s hard coming from Nigeria where everyone’s goal is to get an education and become something, but they don’t realize that if you are a natural born artist, it sort of kills you on the inside when you can’t become who you are. I didn’t like medical school. I used to cry in the labotory. I was 16 and interning for NASA, but I was so unhappy. I tried to please my parents, but it was really hard. It took a leap of faith to convince myself that I could make it in modeling. If you honestly believe in your craft, if that’s all that you think and dream about, you should do it. Life is really, really short. Any one of us could die at any given time, any single say. Any of us. Right the fuck now, you could just die. Do what you want to make yourself happy.

It doesn’t matter if your parents are upset with you, eventually they will come back around because they’re still your parents. I feel like every child brings dishonor at some point, ‘Oh no you bring dishonor!’ I got scouted but went back to school because I felt that I had to give my parents some kind of honor. But I was really, really, really unhappy. I don’t know, it just felt right that I became a model. It just felt right that I wasn’t a medical doctor. Again with my brother’s death, everything was put into perspective so honestly, if you truly believe in something, you should do it. 

Read full interview

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Nigerian pride

  1. 1. push yourself to get up before the rest of the world - start with 7am, then 6am, then 5:30am. go to the nearest hill with a big coat and a scarf and watch the sun rise.

    2. push yourself to fall asleep earlier - start with 11pm, then 10pm, then 9pm. wake up in the morning feeling re-energized and comfortable.

    3. get into the habit of cooking yourself a beautiful breakfast. fry tomatoes and mushrooms in real butter and garlic, fry an egg, slice up a fresh avocado and squirt way too much lemon on it. sit and eat it and do nothing else.

    4. stretch. start by reaching for the sky as hard as you can, then trying to touch your toes. roll your head. stretch your fingers. stretch everything.

    5. buy a 1L water bottle. start with pushing yourself to drink the whole thing in a day, then try drinking it twice.

    6. buy a beautiful diary and a beautiful black pen. write down everything you do, including dinner dates, appointments, assignments, coffees, what you need to do that day. no detail is too small.

    7. strip your bed of your sheets and empty your underwear draw into the washing machine. put a massive scoop of scented fabric softener in there and wash. make your bed in full.

    8. organise your room. fold all your clothes (and bag what you don’t want), clean your mirror, your laptop, vacuum the floor. light a beautiful candle.

    9. have a luxurious shower with your favourite music playing. wash your hair, scrub your body, brush your teeth. lather your whole body in moisturiser, get familiar with the part between your toes, your inner thighs, the back of your neck.

    10. push yourself to go for a walk. take your headphones, go to the beach and walk. smile at strangers walking the other way and be surprised how many smile back. bring your dog and observe the dog’s behaviour. realise you can learn from your dog.

    11. message old friends with personal jokes. reminisce. suggest a catch up soon, even if you don’t follow through. push yourself to follow through.

    13. think long and hard about what interests you. crime? sex? boarding school? long-forgotten romance etiquette? find a book about it and read it. there is a book about literally everything.

    14. become the person you would ideally fall in love with. let cars merge into your lane when driving. pay double for parking tickets and leave a second one in the machine. stick your tongue out at babies. compliment people on their cute clothes. challenge yourself to not ridicule anyone for a whole day. then two. then a week. walk with a straight posture. look people in the eye. ask people about their story. talk to acquaintances so they become friends.

    15. lie in the sunshine. daydream about the life you would lead if failure wasn’t a thing. open your eyes. take small steps to make it happen for you.

Thank you for this. (via gettingahealthybody)

I would love it if it was that easy to live so beautifully

(via squatsandsupernatural)

Love this.

(Source: emma-elsworthy)

policymic:

9 of our favorite female BFFS for Galentine’s Day

Yes, Galentine’s Day was yesterday, but there is still plenty of time to lavish your female friends with love and adoration to show them how much their support and encouragement means to you.

Here are our nine favorite celebrity besties whose close-knit relationships make our hearts burst with feels.

Read the full detailed list 

Follow policymic

Don’t hang out with people who don’t love you. Don’t try to impress people who aren’t worth it. Don’t try to win people over who aren’t worth it. Focus on yourself, and focus on the people who are really awesome and who love you. Don’t hang out with people who make you feel like shit. Don’t spend your energy on them. There is so much pressure to be part of the right thing: well, you should create the right thing. If you don’t see it, create it. If you don’t see what you want, be the change you want to see.
Beth Ditto   (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: theonewithnomakeupon)

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